Monday, May 21, 2007

News from Katrina... More Prayers Needed


Hi Everyone,

We got back from the Mayo Clinic in Arizona and didn't hear the news we wanted to. I do have a motor neuron disease and it's progressed into my back and arms and will continue to my upper body doing the same thing as it is doing to my legs. So there is no cure and no treatment for this one. They were able to pinpoint the exact disease I have which is great because there are over 80 lower motor neuron diseases. The one they found that I have is Progressive Muscular Atrophy. It's a form of ALS and quite similar to it, it's actually a cousin of ALS but you can live longer with it. It is basically the deterioration of muscles in the body that also kill the nerves.

A progressive neurological disease in which the lower motor nerve cells (motor neurons) deteriorate. PMA is not rapidly progressive.

What is PMA?

PMA affects only the lower motor neurons, causing atrophy and fasciculations.

PMA is noted by an absence of upper motor neuron difficulties such as spasticity, brisk reflexes, or the Babinski sign.

Patients with PMA survive longer than patients with ALS and in some cases symptoms can be restricted to the arms or legs for a long period of time before spreading elsewhere in the body.

So we are glad we went and did all the testing. It was more extensive than my other neurologist and I know I would of always wondered, if I had gone to Mayo they would of found something different, so in that aspect I am glad I went. We really missed the kids and it was a long trip. So in a nut shell this is what we found out. Thank you to everyone for all the love, support, prayers, and help you have given to our family. We really appreciate everything everyone did for us to get us there and help with the drs and tests.

Please continue to pray for us!

XO- Katrina
Previous post on Katrina

3 comments:

Christine said...

Katrina and her family are in my prayers.

Love2Learn Mom said...

Thank you Christine.

Crimson Wife said...

How sad :-( May God watch over Katrina and her family and help them cope with this difficult diagnosis.